Big Giant Giveaway: Books, Stim Toys, Chewy Jewelry

It’s been a year since I’ve done a giveaway and to make up for that long gap (and to celebrate the launch of Stimtastic) I’ve decided to give away a whole bunch of things this time.

First,  the rules:

  • To enter, do at least one of the following:
  1. Leave a comment on this post
  2. Reblog the Tumblr post announcing the giveaway
  3. Like or comment on the Facebook page status announcing the giveaway
  • Maximum of 3 entries per person (1 for a comment here, 1 for a reblog on Tumblr, 1 for a comment/like on the Facebook status)
  • The giveaway is open to everyone (over 18 or under 18 with parental permission), including those outside the US.
  • Giveaway ends Monday, November 24th at 11:59 p.m. EST
  • 10 winners will be chosen at random on November 25th. The first winner chosen will get first pick of the items. The second winner can choose from the remaining items and so on. The tenth winner will receive the remaining item.

Good luck!

Giveaway Items:

WINNER: Cecily Shaw 1.  2 Spinner Rings: Arrow and Infinity (your choice of size 6,7,8,9 or 10)

giveaway1

WINNER: Pam Fikter 2. Chewable jewelry necklace and bracelet set #1 (your choice of colors):

giveaway2

WINNER: Daniel Obejas 3. Set of 5 Building Block Highlighters

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WINNER: Gallonjug 4. Set of 3 Stim Toys

giveaway4

WINNER: A. M. 5. “Nerdy, Shy and Socially Inappropriate” Book (Your choice of Paperback or Kindle version)

giveaway5

WINNER: xkrisxcross 6. Thinking Putty (Choice of Blue, Green or Lilac) and Gel Ball

giveaway6

WINNER: Leah Kelley 7. Bike Chain Bracelet (Blue/Silver or Black/Silver)

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WINNER: BLUE 8. Chewable jewelry necklace and bracelet set #2 (your choice of colors):

giveaway8

WINNER: toxiccanary 9. Dog Fidget Necklace and Paracord Keychain (Your Choice of 4 Colors)

giveaway9

WINNER: Mae 10. “I Think I Might Be Autistic” (Your choice of Paperback or Kindle version)

giveaway10

Also, this will be the last substantial post about Stimtastic here so if you’d like to get notifications of giveaways, contests, etc. in the future, please go ahead and follow the Stimtastic BlogFacebook, Twitter or Tumblr.

194 thoughts on “Big Giant Giveaway: Books, Stim Toys, Chewy Jewelry”

  1. So much awesome stuff, especially set 4. Feel like I’d like the chewy necklaces if it wasn’t for having a retainer to wear.

  2. Love your blog and get a lot of insight from it. I am interested in the products you are offering on stimtastic. Would be great to win something! Keep up the great work! Thank you! Anne

  3. I’d love to enter your giveaway please. I’ve entered on FB too. The chewable jewellery is a brilliant idea and I hope it will help my aspie daughter stop pulling out her hair. I’d like to order some of it in time for Christmas, so if I win on your giveaway you could save on the shipping of the freebie (I’m in the UK). When is the last order date for Christmas?

  4. I definitely could use this. When I get really overloaded from sensory I out, I become more fidgety and often seek out oral stimulation. Plus most of these are things can help with focus without being too distracting.

  5. These objects seem to work for me just by looking at their pictures! It’s like all their multi-sensory expression is already present inside my body, which already knows exactly how to use them 🙂

  6. Just found this sight and can’t wait to try out some of your products. As a Special Education teacher I think many of these items would work amazingly well with my students. Thanks for a great concept!

  7. Would love to win, especially the chewy jewellery. My brother’s got Autism and I’d love to win for him, as he bites his hand severely and I always worry he’s going to get an infection or the like,

  8. I love these items especially the Rings (they’re really cool looking) and the Bike Chain Bracelet (I’m a long-time mountain biker, so this has special appeal to me). Best of luck getting this launched and successful.

  9. This is awesome! I’ve been looking at trying a few of your things and posting about them on my blog (while I’m on the spectrum, I talk about coping with chronic physical pain on my blog and a lot of the chronic pain folks I know benefit from various stimming toys to cope with their pain).

  10. These look like fun things. I used to wear a puzzle ring all the time- I actually wore a few out. They are a bit more expensive but excellent for fidgeting.

  11. Something like this would be really useful with crowds or stress or just to keep having fingernails/non-bleeding fingers at all

    also i’m posting this as my tumblr username, is that ok?

  12. Hello,
    This is my first post. I am a retired special educator in Michigan. I have worked with adults with disabilities most of my life. In 2005, two colleagues and I created a reference and organizational system called the Planner Guide. It is now an application as a visual learning tool to help people with social challenges. After I retired I was concerned about lack of services for adults in our area on the spectrum and again with a colleague created a social coaching program. We serve forty adults with Asperger’s in the greater Lansing area. I have been following you for some time and recommend your website to others. I would love to have a copy of, I Think I Might Be Autistic, and Nerdy,Shy, and Socially Inappropriate.
    Bob

  13. i would love to have something from here. i have been so depressed because as i have gotten older find it more and more difficult to function as apposed to elementary. i feel like all my peers grew up and i stayed the same. recently i have received a diagnosis of aspergers. however, as much comfort i have found in realizing i have a community i belong to and a name to my quirks as apposed to weird and proud or shy and selfish; i have been having a hard time coping with my quirks and being an adult among the nt adults and with my nt husband. one big thing is being in public and uncomfortable with lack of things to comfort me as opposed to my safe home where i control my environment. Alsoi have a hard time sitting still. I have recently purchased your book and i have not even finished it yet but it is already making a profound impact on me and my husband is waiting in line to read it so he might better cope and understand my internal workings.
    Ive been in search of maybe a small hand puzzle or toy and kept looking at barns and noble but these are perfect especially the bangles for chewing. I have always noticed i have an oral fixation where it be a lollipop or my wrist. so i fully plan on get that even if i dont win this. thank you so much you dont know how much you have helped me in a small big way.

  14. Just found your blog this evening, via the NT parody post. The post, along with many of the comments, has properly thrown open a window for me. I’m in my 40’s and have never been tested for an ASD. I have always felt different, maybe misunderstood would be a better term, but all the literature I have read, until now, seemed to focus on negative aspects, difficulties and very generalised behavioural stereotypes. The picture they painted never seemed to match my reality very well, it was only ever a part of the whole. As simple as the post seemed, it is a work at pure genius, that has really resonated with me. I know that undiagnosed is unconfirmed, but my thinking is I’ve made it this far without, would it really make a difference now? Would having a diagnosis change the way I see myself or the way I think others would see me? Would that matter? Then again, having been a social recluse for the past 4 years pretty much removes the latter part of that thought. I guess it’s 1 thing to climb into a box, and altogether another to be put into 1.

    I do appreciate you taking the time to share your experiences and thoughts, they have given me much to think about and a fresh starting point.

    Best regards, Ian

    1. The general literature can be very discouraging and often create a lot of red herrings for adults trying to figure out if the label fits. For me, having a diagnosis has made a huge difference because it gives me a coherent explanation for what was previously a bunch of disparate parts that I had to find excuses for one by one. But it’s different for everyone and some people are satisfied with the explanation/suspicion in the absence of formal confirmation.

  15. Just found your blog this evening, via the NT parody post from last year. The post, along with many of the comments, has properly thrown open a window for me. I’m in my 40’s and have bever been tested for an ASD. I have aways felt different, maybe misunderstood would be a better term, and the family have always “known” I was a little different. All the literature I have read, until now, seemed to focus on negative aspects, difficulties and very generalised behavioural stereoptypes. The picture they painted never really seemed to match my reality very well, it was only ever a part of the whole. As simple as your post appears, it is a work of pure genius, and really resonated with me. I know that undiagnosed is uncomfirmed, but my thinking is, I have made it this far without, would it really make a difference now? Would having a diagnosis change the way I see myself or the way others would see me? Then again, having been a social recluse for the past 4 would that really matter? I guess it’s 1 thing to climb into a box, and altogether another to be put into 1.

    I do appreciate you taking the time to share your expreiences and thoughts, they, alongside your reading recommendations, have given me much to think about, a fresh perspective and a starting point for moving forward if I wish to.

    Best regards, Ian

    (I’m sorry if this is duplicated, originally tried to post via my Kindle, not sure if it sent succesfully)

  16. In terms of an official process and ASD diagnosis I’m very much ‘on the fence’ at the moment, this is very frustrating to me! Deep down I know, I have known for many years, but, there is that part of me that just needs some formal acknowledgement or accepted. I’m just genuinely fearful of taking any action that could significantly change the security blanket I wear, or the feel of the bubble I live in. I had developed many coping mechanisms over the years, or maybe cloaking mechanisms is a more appropriate description? I assume we all have to? The death of my Father, when I was 11, resulted in my being institutionalised for a couple of years, after which I attending Military Boarding School before being pushed into the RAF at 17, the whole ‘institutional experience’ was both emotionally overwhelming and yet comforting at the same time. The sense of routine and order was the only thing that kept me together, most of the time, and it was very much a case of adapt, or, well adapt! While not really a positive move, I pretty much gave up fighting the tide about 4 years ago, being ill has taken the energy out of me, so my world has shrunk and any social interaction, outside of visits from my 2 daughters, has become very sparse, hence the bubble. Your site has pinched me, given me something to think about for sure, and I am very much inspired by the comments of others here.

    I do applogise for the tone of my post, it was not my intention to write such a dour sounding reply, 253 words to cover a 31 year train of thought was going to lack something, maybe i should just have left it at..

    Your site has pinched me, given me something to think about for sure, and I am very much inspired by the comments of others here. 🙂

    1. But that’s the beauty of “here” – we can all be totally ourselves, say whatever pops into our heads and be supported at the same time 🙂 It’s a sense of belonging that I don’t think I’ve ever really felt before. And certainly for me, reading everyone else’s comments makes me reframe different events & people in my life and that can be really comforting. I’m even viewing my parents differently and that’s helping a lot.

      1. Thanks for the reply Liz, I am so used to automatically vocalising, or writing down little comments at the end of somthing I’ve written, appologising for coming across as negative or inadvertantly offensive/unthoughtful, when that isn’t my intention. I have a tendancy to ‘not think’ about what im saying, especially when answering questions, I just answer directly as it is.. Hmm, that was a problem with girlfriends, and at most interviews, even learning a script and being able to read from it didn’t help, the moment I look up to talk I’m back to my direct, as is, answer. It will take me a while getting comfortable, or at least, used to, not needing to appologise or excuse my *plain speak. Here seems like a place I could mayhaps acheive that.. eventually!

        Regards, Ian

        *plain speak, to the point, informational not emotional and with no offence intended. I also appreciate the varying age group that reads this blog so that will always be taken into account with topic and tone.

        1. Better to apologise without need than to not apologise when you should (not that I’m thinking of one quasi-friend of mine who never apologises when she’s thrown her toys out of the pram you understand?!) 🙂
          And if more people spoke a bit plainer life might be easier to understand!

  17. 5, 9, and 10 are all ones I would want (the paracord thing instead of the dog keychain). Since my magnet spheres are going to be illegal in April because the CPSC is being jerks for literally no reason, I have to look to other fidgets. =/ (if you want proof, I have links, but trust me, they have no reason for it and are making crap up)

  18. Oh dear, the nerves of my postings have resulted in posting in the thing, sorry for that.. Great prodocts though, I think it is great that some of the most simple ideas and products can have such a positive inpact on an individuals day. good luck to all entering, im sure there will be many smiles from those that win and and for thats those of us that dont, there will always to be aoption to purchase said items from the store. IC

  19. Just wanted to say that the chewable droplet necklace is also great to just hold and squeeze when you have someone banging in stair grippers for your new stair carpet! All that banging is driving me mad so I’m hanging onto it for dear life. I think I’ve just found my source of stress relief for the dentists when I’m desperate to stim and can’t!!

    1. Good to know! Random banging is not good. A few weeks ago my neighbor down the street was getting a new roof and I nearly had to leave the house to work somewhere else. Thank goodness for headphones and loud music.

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